How important is paid media in recruitment?

How important is paid media in recruitment?

In the first instalment of our blog series exploring the role of paid media in recruitment, we discussed how a lack of knowledge was having a negative impact. The focus of this piece is on the role paid advertising can play in fulfilling a recruitment requirement.

Businesses currently looking to hire are facing a number of challenges, not least the fact the market is being heavily candidate driven. In the majority of sectors, the number of opportunities available are exceeding the number of candidates qualified to fill them. Unsurprisingly, this is causing problems. However, utilising paid media can have a crucial part to play in alleviating this headache.

Enables a much larger reach

With hiring becoming increasingly difficult, the approach taken when advertising must be considered much more carefully. Organic strategies are now unlikely to be sufficient in bringing in the desired quality applications. Posting a job role on social media without any budget is likely to bring very minimal results. The reason is simple; only 10-20% of your page followers will be directly exposed to your post on their news feed.

A very different outcome is experienced when paid advertising is introduced. The level of investment influences the impact that is felt, but even a small budget is better than none at all. The number of people you can reach is significantly enhanced, which in turn should ensure better results are obtained.

If that ultimately results in a hire being made, the investment was money well spent.

Ability to target passive candidates

Not only does paid advertising enable a company to reach a much larger audience, within that audience will undoubtedly be a number of passive candidates. Even though these individuals are not actively looking for a new role, interest can still be created.

Attracting passive candidates can be extremely valuable when looking to make a quality hire. Typically, these individuals are already employed in a good job, and their current employer usually wants to retain them. Additionally, the absence of needing to find a new role means they are less likely to hide flaws and inflate skills.

To attract such candidates, the campaign must be powerful enough to grab the attention of top talent. Cutting through the noise can be the biggest challenge, and often requires specialist knowledge of the subject area.

Advanced targeting features

One of the biggest question marks around paid media surrounds the accuracy of the targeting. The answer is that it can be as focused as you want it to be, as the algorithms employed are highly sophisticated. The majority of top advertising platforms offer advanced features which enable you to target the specific audiences you’re attempting to reach. This negates the threat of spending money targeting people who are not relevant.

A range of features are available which help to ensure targeting is as focused and relevant as you want it to be. Specific location areas can be selected, with full control over the exact radiuses to be captured. Therefore, transport links in the surrounding areas can be taken into consideration. This is vitally important in recruitment when looking at commute times and distances.

In addition to the location flexibility offered, audiences can also be refined by interest, job title, and field of study. All are essential factors when targeting, especially in recruitment where experience and qualifications play such an integral role. These fields ensure that only those who match the requirements of the role are served the ads. As a consequence, more relevant applications should be received.

Assisting the long-term strategy

The short-term benefits of running paid media campaigns are clear, but they can also have a positive impact in the long-term. Many organisations have a hiring strategy in place, which align with future growth plans. So, even though there might be a recruitment drive taking place at the time of the media campaign running, success is not limited to the present.

One of the primary reasons for this is the boost that can be provided to your employer brand. By investing in paid media to promote available positions, a considerable number of people are exposed to your brand. This is not only beneficial in generating external awareness of your business, but it can assist future recruitment efforts too. Even if someone isn’t looking to apply for one of your roles right now, it doesn’t mean they won’t in future.

Enabling your brand message to be seen by a wider audience can generate intrigue around your business. This can result in individuals taking a keener interest in future developments, as well as any openings which may arise. Ultimately, a pipeline of talent, already familiar with your brand, can be generated well in advance.

Successfully recruiting top talent is far from straightforward. It can be difficult enough to find these individuals, let alone employ them. However, utilising paid media can offer the exposure required to clear this hurdle.

Written by Tom Chapman, Digital Marketing Executive at Talent Works International. For more information, contact tom.chapman@talent-works.com.

Should you be checking your candidates’ social media pages?

These days, most employers check their candidates’ social media accounts. It seems inevitable, in a culture in which social media use is so prevalent. Checking your candidates’ social media can give a quick insight into their personality. It can also be used as a tool to see if the way they’ve portrayed themselves on their CV and during interviews is accurate.

However, is it ethical?

70% of prospective employers check their candidates’ social media profiles, and 7% plan to start. With this many employers’ utilising this method in their recruitment processes, there are questions about ethics that need to be asked. Such as, is this method invading candidates’ personal lives too far? As well as this there are legal risks involved with seeking out information on job applicants further than the information they have directly given you.

Your company may already have strict rules in place about what hiring managers should and should not know about candidates before interview. For example, any company which utilises blind recruitment techniques should not be checking social media profiles.

However, while many companies do not have such strict restrictions in place, all companies have specific guidelines to follow. This is when it comes to avoiding discrimination based on age, gender, sexuality and race. So, is it fair to judge a candidate on how they portray themselves on social media?

Can you avoid personal bias when screening social media profiles?

Social media profiles can reveal all the above characteristics of a candidate. As well as this, social media can open up a window into other, personal aspects of their lives that they have not directly let you in on.

So, if your recruitment process includes social media profile screening, hiring managers should avoid doing this until they have met the candidate for an initial interview. Utilising the technique before the interview stage could result in accusations of a biased approach to recruitment. No matter your companies’ intentions, it’s always best to eradicate room for misinterpretation.

Social media is most commonly used as a place for personal expression. It should, therefore, be considered that most people do not have future employers in mind when updating their profiles. Social media is, essentially, personal, not professional. So, holding candidates to a professional standard on their profile might mean your company turns down applicants who have the potential to be a perfect fit for the job.

Judging a candidate’s profile to assess if they are a good fit for your company culture is like judging a book by its cover. Social media profiles are rarely completely honest. Often, they show particular elements of people’s lives while leaving out huge chunks.

What are recruiters looking for when screening online profiles?

Research shows that recruiters have been put off candidates by specific things that bother them personally. For example, political rants, alcohol consumption and grammatical errors all proved to be red flags.

However, you cannot judge a person’s entire personality from the parts they choose to show on their social media pages. Often, social media tends to exaggerate some aspects of people’s lives by isolating it.

So, ultimately, there is a real risk that your company could be missing out by checking social media profiles. After all, if there are questions you would never ask in an interview, it is best not to find out the answers via social media inadvertently. Social media profiles very rarely paint the full picture.

Of course, there are benefits to checking social media profiles.

Research has shown that 58% of employers who conduct social media screenings are looking for information to support a candidate’s application. For example, to clarify a person’s identity. If candidates make claims about their personality in their CV, you can try to check these against what they show online. You can also use the platform to gain more of a glimpse into who they are, beyond the CV.

However, it is possible that employers are becoming too dependent on this method to support their recruitment processes. According to research, 47% of employers said they wouldn’t call a person for an interview if they can’t find them online. This indicates a reliance on online profiles that, in some cases, eliminates a candidate from the process.

To conclude?

It is easy to presume that most people now use social media in some capacity. However, many people choose not to. So, it is important not to allow preconceptions to overrule ethical and personal recruitment processes.

So, while checking social media pages can have its uses, it is best to do so with caution. Ultimately, never allow the importance of an online presence to come before a face-to-face communication with a candidate. Digital processes can never replace the importance of human interaction.

How is a lack of knowledge on paid media affecting the recruitment industry?

There are numerous avenues available when looking to fulfil a recruitment requirement. The majority of these are well known and have been discussed at great length. One strategy that doesn’t fall into this category is paid media.

Despite the concept being well documented over recent years, it continues to be largely overlooked for recruitment needs. Google, Facebook and LinkedIn, amongst others, offer strong advertising capabilities. Therefore, considering the wealth of options available, the current lack of use is somewhat surprising.

What is behind the current reluctance?

So, what is preventing businesses from taking advantage of paid media advertising for their recruitment? There are a number of potential explanations, but a lack of understanding features high on the list.

A likely scenario is that decision-makers are concluding that there is insufficient knowledge within their organisation to adequately set up, and maintain, a successful paid media campaign. With the complexities that accompany the day-to-day running of these channels, it’s unsurprising that this is proving challenging.

Which aspects are discouraging the use of paid media?

Even though an increasing number of organisations recognise the importance of paid social media, they also understand the need for expertise in the area.

There are several potential pitfalls when attempting to run a successful campaign, and mistakes can be easy to make when not experienced in the area. There must be consideration shown to the locations to target, the campaign goals to set, the tracking of users who have visited the landing page, the call to action and the media channels to utilise. Failure to acknowledge any one of these aspects can significantly harm the success of a campaign.

How can this barrier be cleared?

However, there is a straightforward solution to this problem; partnering with a specialist recruitment marketing company. By doing so, the creation of your campaign, as well as the daily maintenance necessary to maximise success, are all handled on your behalf. Not only will this ensure adverts are optimised to target the largest and most relevant audiences, but it will also significantly increase the likelihood of good quality applications being harvested.

Another option open to businesses is the use of an RPO provider. RPO, of course, means much more than just handling paid media campaigns, but it can certainly fall into the overall offering.

All aspects of the recruitment campaign can be managed, from the construction of a landing page to the creation of assets to advertise across the most appropriate paid media channels. Such specialisms highlight the value of an RPO provider and the crucial role they can have in ensuring the success of your recruitment campaign.

Witness the success of consumer marketing

How often have you witnessed adverts on the internet related to products or services you have recently searched for? No doubt, countless times. In turn, has that ever prompted you to click through to the page and purchase that item or take advantage of that offer? Most likely. This is a classic example of remarketing.

By retargeting ads to individuals who have recently visited a site, there is a higher probability that the final action will be taken. If an individual has already displayed interest, an additional reminder could be all that’s required to tempt that person into eventually making that all important purchase.

How can it be replicated in recruitment?

A similar approach can also work effectively in recruitment. As a job seeker or passive candidate, you’re likely to come across a whole host of job advertisements while searching the internet. Within that, you may click through to roles which sound of potential interest. However, that will not always translate into an application being made.

In many cases, the timing may not be right to make a move, even if the proposition sounds like an interesting one. Despite this, if served the ad again at a later date through remarketing, it not only reminds the individual of the opportunity, it could represent an appropriate time to register.

Consequently, a similar degree of success can be enjoyed as is experienced with consumer marketing.

Don’t let a shortage of expertise be a roadblock

The digital transformation process taking place at the moment should provide a great incentive to give the green light on utilising paid media. Without doing so, you risk missing out on much of the top talent. By failing to open up your proposition to a broader audience, the quality of responses is likely to be significantly reduced.

Don’t let a lack of expertise within your business prevent you from adopting paid media strategies to propel your recruitment campaign.

This is the first instalment of a blog series exploring the subject of paid media within the recruitment industry, so look out for more over the coming weeks.

Written by Tom Chapman, Digital Marketing Executive at Talent Works International. For more information, contact tom.chapman@talent-works.com.

How to use Snapchat in your recruitment attraction campaigns

Snapchat is one of the most popular social media platforms used by Millennials and Gen Z. In 2019, the total number of daily active Snapchat users is 188 million with 71% of Snapchat users under 34 years old. It is estimated that if you tried to view all the photos shared on the platform in the last hour, it would take you 10 years.

Still, despite the evidence showing these extraordinary levels of engagement, Snapchat isn’t widely regarded as a recruitment tool. However, if your company is keen to recruit graduates or apprentices, Snapchat is where you should be focusing your recruitment efforts.

What is Snapchat, again?

Snapchat is a social messaging app for smartphones which uses photos and videos. The app gives options to add images, text and animations. Essentially, it is a fun way of communicating with your contacts, as all photos and videos sent have a specific time limit before they disappear forever. It’s quick, impermanent, and a bit of a laugh. It’s therefore not surprising that the platform is known as the social media playground.

However, Snapchat is frequently underused because employers do not understand how to use it, or why it can be beneficial. Of course, as with anything, there are both positives and negatives. As an employer, it’s important to fully understand how you could be utilising Snapchat for recruitment.

How can it be used for recruitment?

Snapchat was first created in 2011 and started gaining traction as a recruitment tool not long after, though it took a few years for it to gain real momentum. These days, it’s predominantly being used by employers in 3 ways:

  1. To advertise vacancies in an interactive, fun way.
  2. To attract candidates, by using the platform to shape their employer branding.
  3. As a creative application alternative, rather than going down the traditional CV route.

Advertising vacancies

McDonald’s likes to call their Snapchat recruitment drive, Snaplications. They’ve combined employer branding and recruitment marketing by making 10-second videos of their employees as they discuss what it’s like working for the brand. The viewer can then swipe up on the video to be redirected to the McDonald’s careers page.

This is just one example of how to use Snapchat to advertise your vacancies more creatively. Utilising all of Snapchat’s features in your posts, such as drawings and text, can help make them more fun. However, Snapchat can be used for more than just advertising your vacancies.

Attracting candidates

Snapchat can also be used very much like Instagram, to give candidates a look inside your company culture. Where Snapchat and Instagram differ is that Instagram is designed with more of an aesthetic feel in mind, to project a more idealised version of who you are. In contrast, Snapchat is designed to give more of a fly on the wall feel to the inner workings of your life or, in this case, company.

It’s not meant to be perfect, it’s meant to feel personal. Where Instagram is the ideal platform for well-constructed, beautifully lit photos, Snapchat thrives off spur of the moment, reactive snapshots. The whole point is that because the images disappear, they don’t have to be visually perfect. What they need to do is tell a story, giving potential candidates the opportunity to really see inside the day-to-day.

Creative application alternative

Other companies have used Snapchat to turn the tables on the candidates, asking them to submit short videos to apply for a role. Of course, this only really works for roles that don’t require extensive experience. However, it’s a great way to see how engaged a candidate really is.

For example, for a role that works with social media, asking them to utilise social media as part of their application process is a great way to test their creativity and innovation. If they’re already an engaged Snapchat user, then the likelihood is they are also fairly savvy on all their social media platforms.

If you choose to utilise this, however, then make sure the reasons behind using this method are clear. A pub in Dublin, Sober Lane, asked candidates to send in a video via Snapchat telling them why they should be considered for the role. In response, there were questions raised over whether they had initiated this recruitment technique to enable selective discrimination based on candidate appearance. Overall, however, with a strategic approach, Snapchat can be a fantastic way to engage with your target audience.

Why Snapchat matters

Research shows that Millennials check their phones up to 150 times a day. Gen Zers are heavier users of Snapchat in particular, being active up to 11 times a day”. So, if you want to reach these types of candidates with your recruitment marketing, you need to meet them where they’re at. Media Post says, Gen Z wants authentic brand experiences across all channels and devices, showing that Snapchat’s personal approach to social media is a highly effective way to reach them.

As a result of these findings, the number of companies utilising Snapchat as a recruitment platform – such as AOL and Mitchells and Butlers – is gradually increasing. So, don’t wait until everyone’s doing it, make your mark while it’s still gaining traction.

International Women’s Day: Women in Tech

At Talent Works, we work with several clients in tech. So, we decided, on International Women’s Day, to celebrate the women working in tech.

Technology is an incredible force for good in our ever-changing world. Yet, it is estimated that only 1% of the tech sector will be female by 2040 if there are no interventions. However, the tech industry is gradually changing. More and more women are excelling in tech careers thanks to female pioneers such as those we’re celebrating below, as well as organisations such as Girls Who Code. To celebrate, we thought we’d take a look at some of the women currently changing the future of tech.

Trisha Prabhu

Young software engineer Trisha Prabhu developed an app called ReThink to help curb cyberbullying. After a young girl committed suicide because of online abuse, she was inspired to understand why young people send abusive messages. She learned that the prefrontal cortex, which controls decision-making skills, isn’t fully developed until age 25. Therefore, at times adolescents don’t consider what they do before they do it, resulting in impulsive, often harmful decisions such as sending an abusive message. Prabhu realised that if she could develop an app which detects offensive messages before they’re sent, she could give young people the chance to rethink what they are about to post. The app has been incredibly successful, with research showing that 93% of teenagers who had ReThink decided not to publish an abusive message. You can check out her Ted Talk here.

Zara Nanu

Tech Entrepreneur Zara Nanu founded software business Gapsquare in 2015 to help close the gender pay gap in less than 20 years. Gapsquare uses machine learning to analyse a company’s gender pay gap and flag opportunities to close it as they arise. Data can provide tangible goals for businesses to aim for in terms of their Diversity and Inclusion policies. Such data can influence whether candidates choose to work for certain companies, and in turn, this level of transparency can increase retention rates. So, not only is Zara Nanu helping to end pay inequality, she’s providing lasting change to employee welfare and optimising workforces. You can check out the Gapsquare website here.

Reshma Saujani

Founder of Girls Who Code, Reshma Saujani, is helping to close the gender gap in the tech industries. Girls Who Code provides free after-school programmes which teach girls computer science, communication skills vital for developing a career, and the values of sisterhood. She cites evidence from psychologist Carol Dweck who found that girls with a high IQ were quick to give up on challenging material, whereas boys with a high IQ were more likely to redouble their efforts. Saujani states in her Ted Talk that “women have been socialised to aspire to perfection. Girls Who Code is her answer to the perfection problem, by advocating teaching girls bravery, not perfection.” You can hear her talk about this here.

Kimberly Bryant

Kimberly Bryant is the founder of Black Girls Code, a not-for-profit which works to increase the number of women of colour working in tech, which currently sits at only 3%. The organisation provides opportunities to girls from underrepresented communities, who are talented in the STEM and Computer Science fields. She says, Black Girls Code is about instilling a sense of confidence in their own innate ability, so they can lead and create companies of their own. The organisation is community driven and committed to their own values, having refused grants from large companies they feel are not active enough in the community. Bryant was named as a Champion of Change for Tech Inclusion at the White House in 2013. You can watch her Ted Talk here.

Susan Wojcicki

Susan Wojcicki has been named one of the most powerful women “on the internet.” She was involved in the founding of Google and is now CEO of YouTube. She is also a pioneer of diversity in the workplace, advocating for more women to work in tech and for getting girls interested in computer science. She has also advocated for the US to become a leader in maternity-leave benefits.” Any list of women in tech would be incomplete without her!

Yasmine Mustafa

Named by the BBC as one of its 100 Women of 2016, Yasmine Mustafa is the founder of ROAR for Good, an organisation which produces a piece of tech jewellery called Athena. Athena is designed as a discreet device used to share a person’s location and sound an alarm if they feel unsafe. Initially moving to the United States as a refugee at 8 years old, Yasmine first founded 123LinkIt, a blog advertising agency. Most recently, she founded the Philadelphia chapter of Girl Develop It which provides affordable web development classes for women. A social entrepreneur who is championing the rise of women in tech, Yasmine Mustafa isn’t stopping anytime soon.

Angela Ahrendts

The highest paid executive at Apple until April when she leaves for “new personal and professional pursuits,” Angela Ahrendts has been a surprise to the tech industry. Moving from the fashion industry as former Burberry CEO into the Head of Retail position in 2014, she became one of the most important people in Apple. She leads 50% of the workforce and is still the only woman on the senior leadership team.”

Progress is on the rise, and these are just some of the women spearheading the movement. You can check out last year’s post on our Top 5 marketing campaigns empowering women here.

Happy International Women’s Day to all our colleagues and clients!

Company Culture: Why It Matters In Recruitment Attraction Campaigns

Company culture is important as it can play a crucial factor in determining the success or failure of a business. Evidence shows that investing in company culture can lead to higher performance rates, due to enhanced employee wellbeing, higher levels of development and long-term employee retention.

According to Science Daily, “corporate culture is the most important factor in driving innovation”. So, not only does a strong culture improve employee ratings of their company’s qualities by 20%, being named a “best place to work” leads to a roughly 0.75% stock jump, as can be seen on Glassdoor.

Why is company culture important?

Company culture is of prime importance to economic success. However, research shows that if a negative corporate culture is established early on it can be very difficult to change.

Kotter’s research on this subject showed that there are two essential subcategories of corporate culture, which can be summarised as either visible or invisible. The first few years are critical to forming positive habits that determine overall success; however, change can occur later, it just requires more intentional effort to undo invisible bad practices and establish new ones.

So, here are some steps you can take to ensure your company culture attracts the best candidates:

Start from within

Focus on developing a strong, positive internal culture from the beginning. If this is something you have let slip, then take some time to correct it. Candidates will be comparing multiple companies, so they’ll know if your culture isn’t all you say it is.

So, before you make your culture external, ensure that you have it right. To help with this, you could research your competitors and use them as inspiration. What are they offering that you aren’t?

Although it is great to look at other companies for ideas be careful not to become a carbon copy of them. Establish bonuses and incentives that are aligned with your brand values, which will attract the candidates which are right for your business.

Publish your mission, vision, and values on your website

Once your internal culture is on point, focus on your employer branding and ensure it reflects your culture. Craft a tone of voice that is honest about who you are. Once you have spent some time developing your brand values, put them pride of place on your website.

Some companies can underestimate how important these statements are for candidates. Stand out by being open with what you want to achieve, how you want to achieve it, and how important you consider your employees to be.

Create a careers page

If you haven’t already, create a page on your website that is dedicated to advertising your current job opportunities, as well as giving an overview of your culture. Dedicate pages to the benefits you offer, including socials, team building, and development opportunities, and any extra packages you offer employees such as healthcare and wellbeing.

Be honest about the personality of your company. If your employees are interactive, talkative, and enthusiastic, mention this. Similarly, don’t portray your culture inaccurately. Authenticity will not only attract the right talent for your business but ensure they stay for the long term. It’s not about attracting as many candidates as possible but attracting the right ones.

Ensure your tone of voice is consistent

If your tone of voice has been crafted to communicate your company culture, make sure this is also used within your recruitment attraction campaigns. A change in tone of voice could confuse candidates and discourage them from applying. If you need to, invest in your content to ensure consistency.

Ensure communication with candidates reflects your culture

It’s crucial that your recruitment strategy is efficient, but also make sure that candidates, whether successful or not, have a positive experience throughout the process.

Invite candidates to experience your culture for themselves by introducing simple steps into your recruitment strategies such as an office tour, or meeting with ‘employer brand champions’ within the specific team they are looking to join.

If you need to apply processes to take steps to ensure that unconscious biases don’t come into play, maybe consider blind recruitment.

Develop a set of ethical policies

Studies show that millennial’s are looking to work for employers who reflect their own values and respect their community, with 86% being considered willing to take “a pay cut to work at a company whose mission and values align with their own”.

For example, the environment is one of the most pressing issues of our time, as well as being an issue millennial’s are highly engaged with. If you want to attract up and coming, exciting talent that can transform the future of your business, consider creating your own set of environmental policies. Transform the way your business runs, from everything down to recycling and power usage. As an added perk, consider contributing to environmental charities or supporting your staff with volunteer days.

Other options to consider are a set of policies to ensure diversity and inclusion is a part of your recruitment strategy or implement an internal mental health awareness campaign. Incorporate your policies as part of your talent attraction process by documenting them on your careers page.

Use Instagram

Instagram is a fantastic tool to showcase your culture. Take pictures and videos at social events, celebrations, and office perks. If you treat your staff to lunch, snap it. If your employees are taking part in team building exercises, film it.

Actions speak louder than words, and candidates don’t just want to hear about all the benefits of your culture, they want to see them in action. For more hints and tips on using Instagram for recruitment and to attract talent, see our blog.

Use Social Media

And, on this note, determine which social media channels you will use to communicate your culture. Just as 70% of employers are checking out candidate’s social media pages, they’re doing the same to you. Check out our blog post about using social media to see how you could be using your channels to attract top talent.

Your company culture is integral to your success, both economic and internal, and investing in it should be a satisfying process. It’s all about showing candidates why you’re the right company for them. It’s what’s on the inside that counts.

Why top employers use Facebook Instant Experiences in recruitment

Building your employer brand on social and digital media is not easy. It’s not so much the visibility that is hard to achieve – employers have got their recruitment marketing agencies generating ‘content’ like never before, some good, some not so good. But real audience engagement, beyond just your page impression stats – that’s the true test of whether your employer brand and your social media strategies are working in harmony.

At Talent Works, we’re finding that Facebook Instant Experiences (until recently, they were called Facebook Canvases) are fast becoming an essential tool in almost every attraction campaign.  An Instant Experience is like adding an extra dimension to your mobile campaigns. More immersive than standard digital ads like banners and skyscrapers. Faster to load than a microsite. The capability to pull through vacancy details so candidates can apply via your ATS.

What’s not to like? Well, nothing really. Here’s a breakdown of why some of the world’s best employer brands are all over Facebook Instant Experiences:

  1. It’s a fully mobile experience

That’s right folks. The only place you’ll see a canvas is if you click on an ad, in your Facebook feed, while you’re on mobile. There’s no waiting for a new window to open. It downloads instantly, keeps Facebookers in the moment and the UX is pretty good too. If it’s not what someone is looking for, they can swipe right out and back into their Facebook feed. No harm done to your employer brand there, then.

  1. You want to engage, as well as attract

Instant Experiences come with some nice features that make the user experience more immersive and the candidate journey more engaging. It’s not just a case of ‘read the job ad and hit the Apply button’. When a candidate goes through to a Facebook canvas, they can watch a movie, scroll through a carousel of images, enjoy some animation. There is even a Tilt mode, so that the user can turn their phone to view more image beyond their standard screen dimensions – that’s a great way to showcase an open-plan office space.

  1. The recruitment statistics speak for themselves

Stats say that the average person spends one in every seven minutes of their online time, on Facebook. It’s the largest and most widely used social media platform. The combination of Facebook audiences, programmatic advertising and immersive canvases is proving to be the most effective and frictionless mobile candidate experience. Visit talent-works.com to see some recent case studies from our RPO and employer branding clients.

  1. Your agency will love you

Our Creative teams love the opportunities that Facebook Canvases offer to showcase photography, film, animation and gamification. They also love how easy and fast it is to set up a canvas to support a campaign. This means that we’re giving clients exactly what they want and need: creative campaigns, up and running and in front of candidates quickly.

  1. Instant Experiences are only just beginning

Facebook introduced Canvases in 2016 and consumer brands have been leading the way in exploiting their potential. As more employers begin to see the opportunities involved (and see the response that they help to generate), we will begin to see Instant Experiences being used in more innovative ways. How that mobile candidate experience grows and becomes more immersive – and how the likes of Instagram respond and find new ways to help employers tell their stories – is going to be very, very interesting.

Facebook Instant Experiences are fast to build, user-friendly and align neatly with your social media campaigns and with your existing applicant tracking system. As simple as they are, that all comes together to make them a genuinely valuable asset for talent acquisition teams and their employer brand agencies.

Take a look at one of our campaigns using Facebook canvases.

Promoting your employer brand on Social media: a guide on what NOT to do

Social media is fast becoming the way candidates find out about your employer brand, with a staggering 68% of Millenials choosing to specifically visit company social channels to evaluate their employer brand prior to applying for a role. After the company website, the most visited site when researching a potential employer is their corporate Facebook page. Is it time you took control of your employer brand on social media? In this blog, we go through our top tips on what not to do as well as some inspiring examples from companies who are getting it right.

Stay the same

Each social channel has its own merits and the way content is consumed differs accordingly. Ensure your posts are tailored to the particular channel and limit cross-posting. It can start to look automated if you post the same content on all channels on the same day. Change up your timings or be selective of where you post – will that funny Gif work as well on LinkedIn as it will on Twitter?

Sound like a robot

Automation is efficient and can be really effective if used correctly. But just because something can be automated doesn’t mean it should. Some ATS systems can automatically post job vacancies to your social feeds however, rather than flooding your audience’s feeds with irrelevant job openings, we’d recommend cherry picking the right roles to promote.

Share corporate content or stock imagery

Your content should showcase real people in your organisation and give a true picture of what it’s like to work there. Take advantage of the digital era we live in and encourage your employees to capture shareable moments, which prospective candidates will be truly interested in seeing.

Only post about you

It can be off-putting if a person only ever speaks about themselves- the same can be said for companies on their social media channels. It’s great to post about your employees and organisation, but avoid being predictable or producing forced content. Intersperse this with curated content which represents your brand values, and will be of use to your audience.

Start without a solid Employee Value Proposition (EVP)

It is important for all members of the social media/marketing team to be aware of your brand values before you begin. This will ensure a consistent style and tone across your social channels. A strong EVP will drive your content strategy and have the adaptability to work across various social channels without feeling repetitive.

Ignore your audience

Social media isn’t meant to be a one-way conversation. By interacting with your following and asking questions you’ll increase engagement (major plus!) and you’ll discover insights about your audience that you can use in the future.

Stay free forever

Once you’ve nailed down your strategy and gained an understanding of what your audience likes, don’t be afraid to put some money behind your posts. Using Facebook sponsored advertising, even on a minimal budget, will increase engagement and give you the ability to target specific audiences.

Stretch yourself too thin

The main social channels are LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram but there are others including Google+ and YouTube. Be sensible with the number of channels you decide to use as each will take valuable time to manage. If you have limited resources stick with 1-2 channels and perfect your content before you consider expanding.

Stick to what you know

When it comes to recruiting the social network of choice more often than not is LinkedIn. This doesn’t mean it is the best platform for every business to showcase their employer brand though. If you are only launching on 1-2 social channels initially think about where your target audience spends most of their time, and place yourself in the action.

Go it alone

It’s crucial that your employees back your brand from the beginning and show their support by sharing posts on their channels – especially at the beginning. A good way to do this is by utilising an employee referral program (ERP) which will make it easier for your employees to share your content. As well as increasing your reach, referrals will also increase the quality of applicants. Referred candidates are 3-4 times more likely to be hired than candidates who haven’t been referred.

Who’s doing it right?

There are many companies that are using social media to promote their employer brand. Here are a few examples from organisations who think are doing particularly well.

Employer branding example on Facebook

Why does it work well?

Not only does it use an authentic-looking picture of a Nando’s employee, it is accompanied by a quote about his personal experiences of working there. This post is simple, unpolished and packed full of honesty.

Employer branding example on Twitter

Why does it work well?

The BBC Careers account shares live job listings, but BBC Get In, their entry-level recruitment account, touches on the more human, user-generated side of things. Here, they repurpose images and posts from employee’s to share behind the scenes content. This is posting in its most natural form, and no extra context is required.

As well as this, the name of the channel sets them apart from other more generic careers social channels, and sets the tone for the rest of their feed.

Employer branding example on Instagram

Why does it work well?

Instagram is a place where you can really get creative with your content. Penguin Random House Careers are onto a winner with this post – fun user-generated boomerang image, a quote from an employee and a handful of relatable hashtags which will make the post easier for potential candidates to access.

Employer branding examples on LinkedIn

Why does it work well?

This post by Oath reflects their company values by referencing their commitment to diversity and equality. Including a group photo emphasises their authenticity and commitment to their people.

People spend on average 1 hour 40 minutes a day on social media and it is increasingly becoming the first point of call in candidates’ search for jobs and information on hiring companies. With 69% of candidates more likely to apply to a company which manages its employer brand its crucial, now more than ever, for your employer brand to be present on social media in order to attract top talent.

Looking for more figures on social media? Check out our blog on our top social media stats you need to know if you’re in recruitment.

Instagram, is it making or breaking your business?

I guarantee it could be doing more

As the algorithm strengthens, so does the difficulty of getting your posts seen. Don’t engage with an account for a certain amount of time? They will no longer appear on your feed. Gone are the days of perusing your feed and seeing posts from everyone you follow chronologically.

How to beat the algorithm

As it stands only 10% of your following will see your posts. If the post is well received at this stage, then it will reach the remaining 90%. Getting the most exposure relies on receiving initial success.

Getting engagement rests on giving it out. So get following and engaging with relevant accounts to reap the benefits.

How can you increase engagement?

Get your captions right and use hashtags to your advantage. Don’t piggyback on to irrelevant hashtags, but handpick ones of relevance. Now you can follow hashtags, so this is a good way of getting noticed. But, don’t get too keyboard happy here as Instagram register greater than 30 hashtags as spam, and resultantly blacklist offenders.

Equally think your captions through – if it’s a new service your promoting or a product, is there a clear CTA? Your audience need to know what action they are supposed to take when viewing your post.

If it’s a competition or giveaway, asking a question garners a huge amount of engagement and will get your post more views.

instagram recruiting
General Electric use relevant hashtags to increase engagement

Don’t forget stories

Stories allow you to provide in-the-moment updates, as well as being a place that you can promote and drive traffic to your most recent post (or a blog post or item with the ‘swipe up’ feature).

The accounts you engage with the most will be the stories that are closest to the front of your feed.

instagram recruiting
@Starbucksjobs post stories to drive traffic to their recruitment related updates

Focus on quality and being relevant

Posting for the sake of posting won’t produce the best engagement and it will also make you appear less authentic to your followers.

The algorithm rewards consistency of posting, so focusing on producing quality content at regular intervals will be most beneficial – it’ll also pay to post at times when your audience is active.

instagram recruiting
Jaguar Land Rover Careers post visually consistent and quality images on their feed

Join a pod 

The idea behind an Instagram Pod is to let everyone in your select group know when you’ve posted. Then everyone visits the post and likes it. Then the post will receive a bump in engagement and is considered a good post by the algorithm.

Pods work when formed with groups of like-minded individuals, within the same industry or with similar interests. Plus, everyone will need to be committed and give all accounts the same attention.

Get your account right

Plan out your content – be proactive and reactive. Keep posting. Use a clear CTA. Utilise stories. Engage with your audience (and do it fast). The new algorithm punishes users for taking longer than an hour to reply to comments, so get to it quickly to maximise how many people your posts reach.  

Interested in finding out how you can use social media strategies to get your employer brand out there? Get in touch to discuss the packages we offer.